Monday, December 15, 2014

Electric!

Here's my '58 Royal Electric

Here's the non-working '57 w/ wide carriage




Any advice on how to even start working on the non-functioning RE is greatly appreciated!

6 comments:

  1. The green one looks awesome!

    I've started to warm up to electric typewriters.

    ReplyDelete
  2. DO NOT GET RID OF YOUR 1957 ROYAL ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER!!!! YOU WILL NEED IT FOR PARTS!!!! You have a very nice specimen of a Royal RE (built from about 1955 to early 1959). These machines are very handsome, but their mechanics tend to act a little intense--especially the carriage return. Once you get used to this machine's jumpiness, it really does a good job and has a nice touch. In fact, it has a touch control just underneath the top at the front and center. I own a 1957 Royal electric myself, along with about four spares for parts. I've had it for almost thirty years, and it has given me very little, if any trouble. You mention something about a half-space, and discovering your typewriter doesn't have one. My typewriter has something called a half back space--just to the left of the regular backspace. You press this key and the backspace mechanism brings the carriage back half a space and holds it there as long as you keep this key pressed down. I have only seen one other Royal electric outfitted with this feature, and I have repaired quite a few of these typewriters. Also, the print is very similar on both our machines--though on mine the numbers are different and it rakes up the front of the small "e." Well, fellow RE operator, good luck with your machine, and keep your spare for Heaven's sake 'cause you're gonna need it!! I always recommend this to everyone who has an old typewriter of any kind--if you have a junker identical to the good one, keep it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. DO NOT GET RID OF YOUR 1957 ROYAL ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER!!!! YOU WILL NEED IT FOR PARTS!!!! You have a very nice specimen of a Royal RE (built from about 1955 to early 1959). These machines are very handsome, but their mechanics tend to act a little intense--especially the carriage return. Once you get used to this machine's jumpiness, it really does a good job and has a nice touch. In fact, it has a touch control just underneath the top at the front and center. I own a 1957 Royal electric myself, along with about four spares for parts. I've had it for almost thirty years, and it has given me very little, if any trouble. You mention something about a half-space, and discovering your typewriter doesn't have one. My typewriter has something called a half back space--just to the left of the regular backspace. You press this key and the backspace mechanism brings the carriage back half a space and holds it there as long as you keep this key pressed down. I have only seen one other Royal electric outfitted with this feature, and I have repaired quite a few of these typewriters. Also, the print is very similar on both our machines--though on mine the numbers are different and it rakes up the front of the small "e." Well, fellow RE operator, good luck with your machine, and keep your spare for Heaven's sake 'cause you're gonna need it!! I always recommend this to everyone who has an old typewriter of any kind--if you have a junker identical to the good one, keep it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the advice! I don't use my working RE much just because I'm afraid of its possibly unreliable 60 year old electric components. I'm lucky to have two, and you're right, I should keep the other one around for parts.

      Delete
    2. I'm on the bus with you there--I don't use mine a lot either. It's not the metal parts I worry about so much as I worry about a rubber belt snapping on me. I've had that happen twice on different Royal electrics. On at least one occasion, I had a return strap break on me. This is a BAD thing to happen to an early RE. Their return mechanisms are very hard to get into, and when the return strap breaks, it stays engaged and doesn't stop. The result is the take up spring inside gets shredded. I have had to change out the entire return clutch because I didn't have the tools to get into them at the time (the 1980s). This was no minor surgery. I'd done this twice--ironically it wasn't because I myself had snapped a strap. One machine I got this had already happened to (my '57), and the other one I didn't like their weak, but easier to repair return clutch (my '59 model). Outside of that, these machines are reliable, but, thunderation, they sure snap to whenever you strike the return!!

      Delete
    3. I'm on the bus with you there--I don't use mine a lot either. It's not the metal parts I worry about so much as I worry about a rubber belt snapping on me. I've had that happen twice on different Royal electrics. On at least one occasion, I had a return strap break on me. This is a BAD thing to happen to an early RE. Their return mechanisms are very hard to get into, and when the return strap breaks, it stays engaged and doesn't stop. The result is the take up spring inside gets shredded. I have had to change out the entire return clutch because I didn't have the tools to get into them at the time (the 1980s). This was no minor surgery. I'd done this twice--ironically it wasn't because I myself had snapped a strap. One machine I got this had already happened to (my '57), and the other one I didn't like their weak, but easier to repair return clutch (my '59 model). Outside of that, these machines are reliable, but, thunderation, they sure snap to whenever you strike the return!!

      Delete