Wednesday, June 10, 2015

It's time for a rant!

Early in the morning a few months ago, I typed up this page while I was on a caffeine high from a rather large cup of coffee. I posted it quickly, taking a picture of the sheet rather than take the time to scan it. A few hours later, I removed it because it was very rant-ish for so trivial a subject. Some of you may recognize it, if you were one of the original 14 or so people who saw it. I have posted it up here again because I rediscovered it among some old papers in my desk and I am approximately 60 views from reaching the 4,000 mark, and if it turns out I don't return to this blog I'd like to have at least reached 4,000 views.

Now, before you read, keep in mind that I had consumed a little too much coffee that morning and that I wasn't exactly thinking through everything I wrote.

Enjoy! And remember to take everything I have written here with a grain of salt ;)

(click to enlarge, if you need to.)

7 comments:

  1. How very humble of you for looking at it through the other lens!

    While I think it's a shame so many machines are getting scrapped for keys, you have to look at it from the practical side. 98% of the industrial world today has no use for manual typewriters (despite all of our efforts). If you think about it, it was a really good idea to take those keys and make them into fashionable accessories people would buy. It would be similar to taking an old house and turning into a bed and breakfast (minus the irreversible, permanent damage).

    Instead of chastising them, I think they need to be educated and BEFRIENDED. For example, "Hey, did you know that Royal typewriter is worth more than a bracelet? Sell it to a collector! I know several who'd be interested and would give you a fair deal."

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    1. That's a good idea, actually trying to be helpful to the keychoppers by suggesting they sell the whole machine for a larger profit.

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  2. I wouldn't call this a rant - more a thoughtful call to keep the conversation civil and not to fall into combat mentality.

    Collectors and keychoppers have in common the fundamentals of their attraction to typewriters - they are both drawn to the machines and their parts because typewriters are unusual, beautiful and full of history. You have to admit: a Floating Shift key or a Shift Freedom key is very cool on its own. I get why some people would want to turn these keys into jewelry, but I think they are acting out of ignorance. I agree with Taylor that education could change things. A lot of key choppers don't know that the machines whole are highly sought-after and that seemingly dead typewriters are often easily repaired.

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    1. I guess I probably over thought this typecast when I took it down, and I didn't want to sound like a raving lunatic. Now that I read it again, I suppose it's not really a rant at all ;)

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  3. Key choppers as people, I've never had a problem with that. What they do is the problem. Destroying fine typewriters -- at least on Ebay. I've seen fine looking pre WWII typewriters sold for keys only. I've contacted sellers and many will not budge. Some will sell the entire machine. Key chopping and typewriter art (made from parts of machines) is like many other things where people do not think or research to find the real value of something. But to an artist the keys or parts are important and the machine is not. So I can keep going in circles. We'll never stop key chopping as long as there are typewriters.

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    1. I agree completely. The amount of potential lost in every keychopped typewriter is saddening, and saving as many as possible should be a goal of many collectors.

      I view the whole keychopping problem as more of a fad. When typewriter jewlery loses its popularity, the keychoppers will stop chopping as there's no more profit in it any more. I hope that time comes soon.

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  4. As a purist, I believe that the only time keys should be removed from a typewriter is when that particular typewriter is a parts machine, and the keys are going to another typewriter for that machine to be used. I remember once railing against people removing treadle type sewing machine heads from their bases and using the bases for hallway tables or something. I still have my mother's treadle sewing machine. I replaced the head on it and she used that one just once. I got it at an antique store for only $21.64!! I RAN out of that store so they couldn't catch me if they changed their mind about the price. Anyway, I oiled it and adjusted it, and Maw said it was actually tighter and more accurate than the original head. Anyway, I'm on the bus with you about this keychopping bidness, and am on a typewriter recycling campaign of my own--rescuing as many of them critters and fixing them as I possibly can, and have had fun with this since I was 13 years old back in 1981!!! How many Generation Xers do you know who are into typewriters?

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